Tag Archives: Lomography Redscale XR 50-200

Leaving a Film in the Camera

Given its colour tint and demand for light (I tend to shoot it at ISO 50), the Lomo Redscale is not an easy film to find good scenes for. Combined with a long period of me living out of boxes, this roll ended up staying in the camera for around a year. And when it was finally developed it turned out to contain a few other surprises besides that of re-seeing old frames.

The first surprise was to see the frame on which I suspect the roll had been stuck on in the camera for around 9 months. I’m not completely sure it’s the real reason, but it is striking that Left in Camera is the only frame with two very different colour tints.

The second surprise was that the tint appears to have somewhat shifted over the year, with some shots be quite heavier in the red tones than others. Again this may have been some rustiness on my part, but there was a clean pattern.

At any rate, turns out there’s some evidence to the old advice of not keeping a film in the camera for too long.

First Lomography Redscale XR 50-200

At less than 9€ for three I wanted to try the Lomography Redscale XR 50-200 even if the official photos most of all simply looked like they’d been with a cheap colour film behind a red filter.

The film is rated ASA 50-200, and the seller elaborated by saying that by exposing for 50 you get several hues (what he recommended) while exposing for 200 it’s mostly just red. Looking at samples I decided to go with his advice, but since I’ll still horrible at manual metering inside and in dark areas there are a few which are probably closer to 200.

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Concretely, Backyard ChatRed Chairs and Watch Out are probably exposed for around 50 while Summer FruitsClosed Eyes, and Redscale for around 200. So indeed, like the seller I’m not too much of a fan of the latter but might pick up another pack based on the former.