Tag Archives: Analogue

First LomoChrome Turquoise

I’ve already tired the LomoChrome Purple a few times, finding the results amusing for certain settings. Hence, when they released the LomoChrome Turquoise I bought a couple, and finally got around to finishing the first roll.

As seen in Leaves or Roof Tree, clear blue skies turn orange when not overexposed (and lightgrey otherwise). Green colours turn turquoise, and some dark shades turn red (e.g. Red and Green). Many other colours disappear (e.g. City Park or Missing Colours), and skin tones turn scary (e.g. Walk in the Park).

In summary, for this roll, scenes with blue, green, and orange turned out best.

Le Touquet (with Paris)

I hadn’t shot a Kodak Ektar for a long time — somehow the last one had left a bad impression, though looking at it now I can only vaguely remember why. In any case, a good friend talked positively about it recently so decided to give it another try.

The rendering of City Park is great, and the same for Windows, Sea Resistance, and Les Pirates. The rendering of Bunker HotelMarket Barn, and View is close to how I remembered the film, being either a bit too strong on some colours (reds) or a bit too dark on others (dark greens). The rest look somewhat like a Kodak Portra.

Overall I’m happy with the result and have a more positive opinion on the film now. Perhaps it’s important to not underexpose the film, and to use something else for scenes with dark greens and, to a lesser extend, blues.

Leaving a Film in the Camera

Given its colour tint and demand for light (I tend to shoot it at ISO 50), the Lomo Redscale is not an easy film to find good scenes for. Combined with a long period of me living out of boxes, this roll ended up staying in the camera for around a year. And when it was finally developed it turned out to contain a few other surprises besides that of re-seeing old frames.

The first surprise was to see the frame on which I suspect the roll had been stuck on in the camera for around 9 months. I’m not completely sure it’s the real reason, but it is striking that Left in Camera is the only frame with two very different colour tints.

The second surprise was that the tint appears to have somewhat shifted over the year, with some shots be quite heavier in the red tones than others. Again this may have been some rustiness on my part, but there was a clean pattern.

At any rate, turns out there’s some evidence to the old advice of not keeping a film in the camera for too long.

Japan

I’d been wanting to go to Japan for years, and now seemed as good as ever. Taking the best of two days for travel, it had to be limited to nine full days there, with five spent in Tokyo, two in Kyoto, and two for what lies in-between.

It should come as no surprise that Tokyo was amazing. The cleanliness, the cityscape, and the seeming separatism from the US (compared to large parts of Europe at least). My impression is that it would be hard to move there for good — but coming back to work there for, say, one year is on my list now.

Unfortunately there wasn’t much time left over for Mount Fuji, but we did take the advice of many and stayed a night at a tradition Japanese inn, which is hereby passed on. Got to see the mountain though, and driving past a Fujifilm factory on the way I also finally made that connection (ever wondered why the network gigant is called Cisco?).

In Kyoto the most impressive thing was the Fushimi Inari Taisha shrine, with the entire Inari mountain essentially covered in Japanese Torii gates.

And of course everything was documented with Fujifilm, specifically Superia 200 and 400, and shot on a Nikon FM.

A Few Firsts

First up is a Rollei Chrome CR 200. Not overly impressed and not overly forgiving, it does have some likeable browns and reds when the exposure is right.

Second up is the CineStill 50 Daylight X-Pro. which, unlike the other CineStill is calibrated for shooting outdoor at daylight as opposed to indoor with low light. Much better first impression of this one and looking forward to shooting the next roll — skin tones and blues in particular seem great.

Last one is an Adox Color Implosion 100 which gave a few interesting shoots, such as the dreamy toning in East Paris. Cute film though perhaps also a bit demanding and picky.

La Reunion

Although seemingly unknown to the non-French speaking part of the world, La Reunion island a few hundred kilometers east of Madagascar is an amazing little place, offering everything from sandy beaches, whale watching, parachuting, downhill biking, water rafting, lava tunnels, jungle, forgotten mountain villages — and of course wonderful diving. Only bad part is that the roughly ten hour flight makes it expensive to get there.

We went there for an active vacation and got exactly that: up around seven every morning and sleeping tightly before ten. We had rented a small hillside bungalow on Airbnb for 30 euro a night and a silly little Peugeot that, while never failing us, didn’t seem to be in its right element.

Volcanos play a significant part on the island, separating the rough weather on the west side of the island from the clam and sunny east side. And providing the centre with yet another climate: rain forest.

Spring Shots

Spring is a great time to take photos. Not only is a long photo-crippling cold winter coming to an end, colours are also shooting out from everywhere.

I like Spring and the bright green colours of the tree; I still remember taking the photo, waiting for the wind to lift the leaves to show their lighter bellies.

Wedding and Breath of Air were taken at a typical French wedding hosted at a country side castle.

Another Lomography X-Pro Slide 200

When the exposure is right I really like the Lomography X-Pro Slide 200, but it seems I’d somewhat forgotten this while shooting this roll: don’t overexpose!

I like Trains, shot on a winter evening, of this little, rather specialised, store around the corner from Place de la République. As a kid we had a large track in the basement, and one can only be happy to realise that these toys have not gone completely extinct yet.

The colours in Ida are exactly what I’d like most shots to look like, yet unfortunately there aren’t many like that on the roll due to overexposure; Sleeping under the Bridge for instance is nice for the scene of SDF’s (refugees?) camping under a metro bridge, but it’s hard to argue that better colours would have made it better.

Winter and Charlie Hebdo

As in these two rolls of film, the tragic Charlie Hebdo shootings filled up a large part in-between the typical events this winter. Having participated first and foremost as a peaceful demonstrator, I’m happy that bringing the camera along that day allowed me to capture a bit of that very unique atmosphere.

The first roll contains a bizarre mix of family christmas photos, random walk around Paris, and a scenes of shootings.

The second roll covers the peaceful demonstration, as well as more winter travelling.

Both were Kodak Portra, and on a technical note I’m actually surprised how well it stood up to the clearly underexposed evening shots.